Attorney


Power of Attorney and Health Care – General – Wisconsin Related Wisconsin Legal Forms POWER OF ATTORNEY FOR HEALTH CARE General Requirements (§155. 10): A power of attorney for health care MUST be in writing;dated and signed by the principal or by an individual who has attained age 18, at the express direction and in the presence of the principal; signed in the presence of 2 witnesses who meet the statutory requirements (see below); and be voluntarily executed.

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Meta Power of Attorney is a written, legal contract in which an individual, the principal, grants another individual, the agent, the authority to act on the principal’s behalf in regard to private, business or financial decisions. Reliable, statutory, and medical are the profitable assortments of the POA that are available at present. Establishing the scope of, and boundaries to, the agent’s power is important to a successful relationship between the two parties.

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A Power of Attorney document may be one of the most important things you’ll ever sign.   This document allows you to give someone else permission to legally act on your behalf.   A Power of Attorney protects your best interests in the event you are ever injured, incapacitated or otherwise unable to make decisions for yourself. Signing a Power of Attorney document does not mean you are signing your rights away.

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Someone once noted that life, at its best, is completely unpredictable. While that is a reality, there are certain steps that you can take in order to be prepared for the unexpected. We often take for granted that we are able to make daily financial, medical, and personal decisions, forgetting that our ability to make these decisions may be impaired in the future. As such, it is only prudent to make sure that your medical and financial affairs will be in the hands of someone you trust, in the event that you are physically or mentally unable to handle those affairs.

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Successful businessmen and women often share similar characteristics: they work hard, they are determined, they are quick to see an opportunity, they enjoy taking decisions and they plan ahead.   What they are not is indestructible – indeed none of us is, although perhaps sometimes we fail to plan with that in mind. Previous articles on this website have focused on what might happen to you or your family should you find yourself unable to manage your own affairs, either temporarily or permanently, but if you also run your own business, what would happen to that – especially if you haven’t previously appointed a Power of Attorney? In recent years, increasing numbers of people have started their own businesses, often later in life.

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The attorney general announced his resignation, but who will be next? Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation Thursday afternoon. Holder is the first black U. S. attorney general and in his six years of service, his impacts on the nation include challenging Texas’ voter ID law, striking down the Defense of Marriage Act and opening discussion on racial tensions and police violence in Ferguson after Michael Brown’s murder.

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U. S. Attorney General Eric Holder is resigning from office after six years of being America’s Top Cop. The resignation comes on the heels of the Michael Brown shooting in Ferguson, Missouri, and years of showdowns with Congress over numerous policy issues. NPR first broke the news of Eric Holder’s resignation. However, according to Evan Perez with CNN. the rumors have been running rampant for quite a while now.

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Website The United States Attorney General (A. G. ) is the head of the United States Department of Justice per 28 U. S. C.  § 503. concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. The attorney general is considered to be the chief lawyer of the U. S. government. The attorney general serves as a member of the president's cabinet. and is the only cabinet department head who is not given the title secretary.

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01/09/2007 - Power of Attorney - State: AL #255 Full Question: Who can be granted a power of attorney and who cannot? Answer: Section 26-1-2 of the Code of Alabama provides in part: (a) A durable power of attorney is a power of attorney by which a principal designates another his or her attorney in fact or agent in writing and the writing contains the words "This power of attorney shall not be affected by disability, incompetency, or incapacity of the principal" or "This power of attorney shall become effective upon the disability, incompetency, or incapacity of the principal" or similar words showing the intent of the principal that the authority conferred shall be exercisable notwithstanding the principal's subsequent disability, incompetency, or incapacity.

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by Rania Combs on June 27, 2011 A man (who I’ll call “Jack”), recently called me in a bit of a panic. His fiance (“Jill”), with whom he had lived for many years in a home they purchased together, had been recently diagnosed with breast cancer. Jill was starting chemotherapy the next day and he was concerned, not only about his her health, but also about the uncertainty of life if tragedy were to strike.

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